SAT Test Writing and Language Section

The Writing and Language Section consists of short passages that require your editing skills. With practice (that darn word keeps popping up, huh?) you will quickly realize if you can afford to answer questions in order or if it will be more advantageous to answer the questions that don’t require context first. (You may decide you have to read the entire passage to answer the context questions.)

sat test writing and language section

If you don’t feel like your writing and language skills get used enough everyday, we’ll help you get them up to speed!

Staying calm is always easier said than done but remember that there is no advantage to having existing subject knowledge on the passage. It’s kind of like an editor, really. Editors have to be able to understand the passage’s tone and purpose while also ensuring it is grammatically correct. All of the questions in this section are multiple choice and approximately 25% of the editing questions will not require any change. (Read: Select answer A for those questions.)

What’s that? You don’t understand what we mean by selecting answer A? It’s OK. You’re going to P-R-A-C-T-I-C-E and get very comfortable with the test format so you don’t have to waste time reading instructions during the test, right? Also, this acquired familiarity is going to help you keep calm during the test. For this writing and language section as well as the others.

So, without further ado, let’s go over the three broad types of questions you will see in the SAT test writing and language section:

Context

These are the most difficult from the time management perspective, because they can require you to potentially go back and re-read a passage that has been stretched out over a few pages. Context questions include mapping out the best placement for sentences or entire paragraphs; author’s main point; and evidence substantiation.

Word choice

You will need to understand the sentence’s intention and keep an eye out for brevity and succinctness.

Grammar

You will be quizzed on all the usual suspects: commas, semicolons and colons; subject-verb agreements; apostrophes; homonyms and more!

Where to go from here:

SAT test writing and language section practice questions